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Der fliegende Holländer/ Le Vaisseau fantôme4_stars

A brace of ghost ships disembark on disc

Mark Pullinger

One of the more http://imageshack.com/a/img401/5246/82p0.jpgenterprising celebrations to mark Wagner’s bicentenary last year now arrives on disc courtesy of Naïve. Conductor Marc Minkowski had been considering recording Die Feen, but opted instead for the original 1841 version of Der fliegende Holländer, presented in a single act, coupling it with Pierre-Louis Dietsch’s opera Le Vaisseau fantôme. The two share a tangled history. Wagner had arrived in Paris in 1839 wishing to write for the Opéra and devised a one-act scenario which could take place as a curtain-raiser to a ballet. A libretto and even some music (Senta’s ballad among them) were shown to Léon Pillet, the director of the Opéra, who promptly dismissed it. Instead, he offered to purchase the synopsis (and possibly the libretto) from Wagner for 500 francs.

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Round Britten on disc

Mark Pullinger

Last week, I http://imageshack.com/a/img801/5995/ktdd.jpgfinally got my hands on the new 50 pence piece the Royal Mint issued to commemorate Britten’s centenary, inscribed with lyrics from his ‘Serenade for tenor, horn and strings’. Its appearance in my sticky paws is nearly as belated as this round-up of CD releases, which considers two new recordings of key Britten works alongside a monumental Decca reissue of his complete operas.

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Vivaldi: Catone in Utica5_stars

Dazzling vocal pyrotechnics in latest Vivaldi Edition opera

Mark Pullinger

Although he http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/8908/gkdw.JPGclaimed to have composed around ninety operas, there cannot be many left in the archives of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Turin for Naïve to record in its ongoing Vivaldi Edition if you discount pasticcios, reworkings and incomplete works. Their latest offering, the fourteenth opera in the series, falls into the latter category, for only Acts II and III of Catone in Utica have survived. The opera was written to celebrate the culmination of his third and final season at Verona’s Teatro dell’Accademia Filarmonica – a profitable success for the composer. Premiered in 1737, it is unknown whether Act I was even written by Vivaldi himself, or whether music by other composers was employed.

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Verdi: Simon Boccanegra4_stars

A recording worthy of rubbing shoulders with the best

Mark Pullinger

For an opera http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/5295/y8g5.jpgwhich took its time to garner public acclaim, Simon Boccanegra has been remarkably lucky on disc. Gabriele Santini’s 1957 EMI recording has Tito Gobbi and Boris Christoff squaring up to each other as the Doge and Jacopo Fiesco. Giorgio Strehler’s La Scala production was instrumental in reviving the opera’s fortunes and Claudio Abbado’s related DG recording is regarded as the benchmark by many, with a splendid line-up featuring Piero Cappuccilli as Boccanegra, Mirella Freni as his long-lost daughter, Nicolai Ghiaurov as Fiesco and a fresh-voiced José Carreras as Gabriele Adorno. Gianandrea Gavazzeni’s RCA account, recorded four years before Abbado’s, is often undeservedly overlooked. It again features Cappuccilli in the title role, joined by Katia Ricciarelli, Ruggero Raimondi and Plácido Domingo. Even Georg Solti’s 1988 recording, forerunner to this new effort from Decca and often received relatively poorly, has things to recommend it, not least the silky Amelia of Kiri te Kanawa. This newcomer clearly has its work cut out to compete with such a distinguished discography.

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Jonas Kaufmann: The Verdi Album4_stars

A fascinating preview of Kaufmann's Otello

Sebastian Petit

Coming so http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/5404/n9to.jpgsoon after his exceptional Wagner album for Decca an album of Verdi favourites with Jonas Kaufmann could easily have seemed anti-climactic. So let’s get the worst news out of the way first - Kaufmann was never suited to the superficial glamour of the Duke of Mantua and the insouciant glee of “La donna è mobile” is simply not in his armoury. Pavarotti sounds like a ray of careless sunshine in the aria whereas Kaufmann merely manages to sound lachrymose. There are at least ten other Verdi arias or duets I would have preferred him to tackle and would have suited him infinitely better. If he really felt the need to tackle an excerpt from Rigoletto then “Ella mi fu rapita” would have been a wiser choice. However I have a horrible feeling that the decision to record this piece at all was a cynical commercial choice, providing an instantly recognisable, bite size bon-bon for the commercial market. If so, it is unworthy of both the artist and his new record label.

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Plácido Domingo: Verdi (Sony)4_stars

In terms of Verdian artistry, Domingo still has a lot to say

Mark Pullinger

It’s rare for a http://img198.imageshack.us/img198/3369/6xql.jpgdisc of Verdi baritone arias to make headline news, but when the ‘baritone’ in question is septuagenarian tenor Plácido Domingo, eyebrows and expectations are similarly raised. It’s been a few years now since his first forays into baritone territory, with performances of Simon Boccanegra in Berlin, New York, Milan and London and the experience has obviously whetted his appetite. Domingo’s curiosity has always led him into exploring new roles, be it zarzuela or Wagner, so it’s no surprise that Boccanegra proved emphatically not to be his final new role; Rigoletto, Germont père, Doge Foscari and Nabucco have all followed and there is a Conte di Luna ahead in Berlin this autumn. Indeed, he has more of these roles ‘under his belt’ than Jonas Kaufmann or Anna Netrebko on their respective Verdi discs, which are largely augurs of roles to come.

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Wagner: Das Rheingold/ Wesendonck Lieder

Second release in Mariinsky Ring cycle, plus songs from Stemme

Mark Pullinger

It is perhaps http://img853.imageshack.us/img853/456/13hy.jpgunderstandable that the Mariinsky label launched their Ring on SACD with Die Walküre, starrily cast as it was, rather than with the ‘preliminary evening’ Das Rheingold. When you have a cast boasting Jonas Kaufmann and Nina Stemme, hook in the punters and hope they’re impressed enough to stay the course for the rest of the cycle. So how does that preliminary evening hold up? The Mr and Mrs Wotan of René Pape and Ekaterina Gubanova are happily still employed, on a mountain top awaiting completion of Valhalla, joined by Stephan Rügamer as a distinguished Loge. The rest of the cast is made up of Mariinsky regulars, some more successfully cast than others.

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Anna Netrebko: Verdi (DG)4_stars

The finest contribution on disc in Verdi's defence this year

Mark Pullinger

Listening http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/1950/9huv.jpgto Anna Netrebko fearlessly launch into Lady Macbeth’s fiendish ‘Vieni! T’affretta!’, it’s difficult to recognise the slip of a soprano whose Natasha entranced audiences in 2000 when she made her Covent Garden debut in the Kirov Opera’s War and Peace. I have rarely been so wowed; the production poster remains on my wall to this day. She didn’t make her Metropolitan Opera debut until two years later (also Natasha), when she signed to DG. Mozart and bel canto roles followed – a string of Elviras, Adinas and Norinas – along with Mimì, Violetta and Gilda. On disc, the best of her studio albums to date has been her Russian album, ironic considering she has eschewed these roles on stage, possibly for fear of typecasting. This season has finally seen her debut as Tatyana in Yevgeny Onegin, a role she could easily have owned for the past decade. But what of Verdi?

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Bellini: Norma5_stars

Bartoli's Norma scrapes away the barnacles

Sebastian Petit

The first http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/2190/normadecca.jpgthing to say about this recording is that one needs to put out of one’s mind most of the famous recordings that have preceded it since what one is accustomed to hear from the Callas, Sutherland, Caballé recordings or even further back excerpts from Cigna or Ponselle is a radically different work of art. Giovanni Antonini, Riccardo Minasi and Maurizio Biondi have spent years scraping away the barnacles of dubious performance tradition and updated instrumentation and restoring hundreds of small cuts that have become part of the standard performing edition. As with a restored oil painting the removal of years of accumulation has revealed a very different work of art. Indeed I would say that it redefines the work both in terms of sound and in appropriate casting.

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Piotr Beczala: Verdi2_stars

Mark Pullinger

If I had been http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/7204/piotrbeczalaverdi.jpgcommissioned to design the booklet cover for this disc of Verdi arias and duets featuring Polish tenor Piotr Beczala, it would feature an image of a Brazil nut, emblazoned with the face of dear old Giuseppe, quivering beneath a sledgehammer. This would give the prospective purchaser an idea as to what to expect from the tenor’s approach and it would, indeed, be as unexpected as it is disappointing. I rate Beczala extremely highly and he would be in my top four tenors performing this sort of repertoire today (Jonas Kaufmann, Joseph Calleja and the underrated Marcelo Álvarez being the others), but this recital disc will do his reputation few favours.

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Wagner: Die Walküre5_stars

Mark Pullinger

Let’s play fantasy http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/8956/gergievwagnerwalkure.jpgopera casting! You’re commissioning a recording of Die Walküre, the first release in a projected Ring cycle to mark Wagner’s bicentenary. Money is no object. Assemble the finest cast you can. Pencils poised? Go!

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Dimitri Hvorostovsky: In this moonlit night4-half_stars

Mark Pullinger

Soon after his http://img832.imageshack.us/img832/1918/hvorostovskyondine.jpgtriumph in the BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition, Dmitri Hvorostovsky launched his recording career with a tremendous disc of Verdi and Tchaikovsky arias which, like a fox marking his territory, set out his stall of repertoire that would soon have opera houses around the world competing to engage him. Soon afterwards, however, a recital disc emerged which showed us another facet of his art – Russian song.

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Mariusz Kwiecien: Slavic Heroes5_stars

Mark Pullinger

When the http://img406.imageshack.us/img406/53/kwiecienslavicheroes.jpgBolshoi brought its controversial production of Yevgeny Onegin to London in 2010 with a Polish baritone in the title role, it seemed rather perverse, a bit like The Royal Opera touring Peter Grimes starring a French tenor. However, the Polish baritone in question was Mariusz Kwiecien, who has the requisite looks and vocal characteristics for the role and seems ready to claim the mantle of ideal interpreter from the shoulders of Dmitri Hvorostovsky. The smouldering Siberian included arias from Onegin on his debut disc, as does Kwiecien, but where Hvorostovsky paired Tchaikovsky with his trademark Verdi, Kwiecien has stayed closer to home with an inventive programme entitled Slavic Heroes.

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Decca Opera Reissues: Verdi

Mark Pullinger

The latest http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/2199/trovatoremehta.jpgclutch of Decca opera releases includes four Verdi operas, three of which are being reissued for the first time, alongside a much underrated recording of Otello from 1978. In these times where studio recordings of complete operas are rarer than hen’s teeth, reissues of classic sets remain a tempting way of bolstering the library, stocking its shelves with issues missed first time round, but also makes for an inexpensive introduction to the art-form for newcomers. Libretti and translations are available online. Reviewed here are: Zubin Mehta's Il trovatore, in Luciano Pavarotti's second recording; Macbeth conducted by Riccardo Chailly with Leo Nucci and Shirley Verrett; the original 1862 St Petersburg version of La forza del destino, conducted by Valery Gergiev; and Georg Solti's studio recording of Otello, featuring Carlo Cossutta and Margaret Price.

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Gioia! Aleksandra Kurzak (Decca)4-half_stars

Mark Pullinger

It was pure coincidencehttp://img17.imageshack.us/img17/5807/kurzakgioiacd.jpg that this debut operatic recital disc from Aleksandra Kurzak dropped through the letter box the very same day I saw the Polish soprano perform the role of Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. It was the perfect assumption of the role – her light soprano silvery glinted, but without being hard-edged, allied to a truly enchanting stage presence to melt the stoniest of hearts – so that it was easy to be smitten by Kurzak’s singing on this disc, where ‘Deh vieni, non tardar’ is a suitable memento of a role she’s also taking to La Scala and Vienna this year. I thought I’d wait a few days to audition the disc again, to listen critically at greater distance. Yes, one or two minor niggles surface, but it’s still an adorable disc.

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The Teldec/ Erato Opera Collection

Mark Pullinger

Warner is http://img28.imageshack.us/img28/3234/hoffmannnagano.jpgbusily reissuing many of the opera recordings made by Teldec and Erato in the 1990s. Available at bargain price, there is the occasional rarity to explore and some excellent performances to be discovered. Booklet information, however, is minimal, limited to a cued synopsis in English, French and German, with no libretti or translations provided. These reissues from the vaults of Teldec and Erato, including Les contes d'Hoffmann with Roberto Alagna, Sumi Jo, Natalie Dessay and José van Dam; Tristan und Isolde with Siegfried Jerusalem and Waltraud Meier; La cenerentola with Jennifer Larmore; Thomas Hampson as Billy Budd and a Così fan tutte from Daniel Barenboim.

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Dame Joan Sutherland: The Art of the Prima Donna (Decca)images/stories/star_ratings/5_stars.jpg

Antony Lias

It has been just over a year since Dame Joan Sutherland died, but Decca’s re-issue of her seminal recording The Art of the Prima Donna is a fitting way tohttp://img831.imageshack.us/img831/6717/joansutherlandartofthep.png remember the artistry of the soprano known to many as La Stupenda, the stunning one.  Recorded in 1960, the year after her celebrated triumph in Lucia di Lammermoor at Covent Garden catapulted her to international fame, this recording captures the young Sutherland in blistering form.  It is arguably the greatest recital disc ever produced by a soprano, and consequently there can't be many admirers of the distinctive Sutherland sound or the opera going public in general, who do not already own a copy.  However, for those of you who do not have it, then it is time you dusted off your wallets and purses and stopped dallying around with the likes of Netrebko and Gheorghiu and listen to the real deal!

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Beethoven: Fidelio (Decca)4_stars

Mark Pullinger

Despite some http://img194.imageshack.us/img194/2153/fideliodeccaabbado.jpgwonderful vocal performances, this is very much Claudio Abbado’s Fidelio. Following his re-evaluation of performance practice in his Beethoven symphony cycle with the Berlin Philharmonic, which followed Jonathan del Mar’s (then) new critical edition of the scores, he turns his attention to the composer’s single opera. Recorded during two semi-staged concert performances in the 2010 Lucerne Festival, this is a lean, chamber-sized account, every note precisely placed, but with enough punch for the drama to hit home. Abbado opts for the 1814 Fidelio overture, rather than any of the Leonoreovertures. The playing is glorious throughout, the Lucerne Festival Orchestra, largely made up of players from the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, is incredibly fine, responding to Abbado’s alert pacing and scrupulously observing dynamic shadings. The chamber-sized orchestra allows woodwinds to clearly register, the textual transparency allowing one to marvel afresh at Beethoven’s orchestration.

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Rossini: Guillaume Tell (EMI)4_stars

Terry Blain

Rossini was 37 http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/1796/williamtellfrenchpappan.pngwhen Guillaume Tell was premiered, in 1829, at the Paris Opéra. It was his thirty-ninth and last opera, and he lived another 39 years without composing another. Did he know that Tell was his operatic swansong when he was writing it? Had the incredible productivity of the previous nineteen years finally caught up with him? Was he ill, written out and exhausted? Had he simply lost the stomach for the grinding itineracy and intrigue of the European opera circuit?


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Mozart arias: Ildebrando D'Arcangelo (DG)3-half_stars

Mark Pullinger

In her http://img847.imageshack.us/img847/6673/arcangelomozartalbum.jpgbook Bravo, Helena Matheopoulos reports director Frano Enriquez citing Ruggero Raimondi’s voice as ‘spermatozoic’, a quality perfect for the rapacious, seductive Don Giovanni. Ildebrando D’Arcangelo’s bass-baritone is very different in colour, depth and tone from Raimondi’s, yet has a rich, velvety quality which is tremendously attractive and similarly deserving of the ‘spermatozoic’ tag. This disc of Mozart concert and operatic arias is rather an old-fashioned recital, though none the worse for being so; without a single ‘star guest’ in sight from the company’s stable to participate in a duet or two and featuring a modern-instrument orchestra whose only concession to ‘historically informed performance practice’ appears to be hard timpani sticks.


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Boito: Mefistofele (Naxos)4_stars

Does the http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/2460/mefistofelenaxos.jpgshift in emphasis from Faust to Mephistopheles in Arrigo Boito’s treatment of Goethe’s drama result in the devil having all the best tunes? Not entirely, but it is surprising that more basses haven’t taken up the title role in Boito’s most significant contribution to opera as a composer (he will always be remembered first and foremost as the librettist of Verdi’s Otello and Falstaff). It places the devil at the centre of events, wagering with the Almighty in the Prologue that he can lure Faust into his power, only to be beaten into retreat, (forked) tail between his legs, in the Epilogue. In recent times, only Samuel Ramey has championed the role, so a Naxos release featuring the pre-eminent Italian bass of our day, Ferruccio Furlanetto, is especially welcome.

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Sir Arthur Sullivan's Ivanhoe: Chandosimages/stories/star_ratings/3-half_stars.jpg

Sir Arthur Sullivan’s name will forever be inextricably linked with that of W.S Gilbert, but it’s easy enough to overlook the http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/184/ivanhoe.jpgfact that the man responsible for all those delightfully jolly tunes in the Savoy operas was also a serious classical composer in his own right, having written a prolific amount of church music, orchestral compositions and oratorios in addition to twenty-three operas, including the fourteen he wrote in collaboration with Gilbert. While his famous comedy masterpieces such as The Mikado and HMS Pinafore are still widely performed today, much of Sullivan’s other work languishes in forgotten obscurity, including his serious opera Ivanhoe, which was once so popular with the British public that it originally ran for 155 consecutive performances at the newly-built Royal English Opera House (now the Palace Theatre) - the undisputed ‘hot ticket’ for London theatre-goers in 1891.

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Michael Maniaci: Mozart Arias For Male Soprano (TELARC)images/stories/star_ratings/4-half_stars.jpg

This disc represents an auspicious debut by the American male soprano, Michael Maniaci. In a world now positivelyhttp://img31.imageshack.us/img31/7821/maniacij.jpg crammed with counter tenors, Maniaci represents a stupendous contrast both in timbre and in range. Unlike falsettists (which practically covers all counter tenors and other male sopranos), Maniaci possesses a natural male soprano due to the lack of thickening of his vocal cords during puberty. Consequently this disc presents the listener with an opportunity to explore some of the ethereal characteristics that were associated with the timbre of the long dead castrato voice. Aside from some scratchy recordings of Alessandro Moreschi (generally recognised to be the last castrato, who sang in the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel choir until 1913) from 1902 and 1904, we have little to go on in terms of re-imagining this most celebrated of voice types, aside from contemporary criticism.

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The Sacrifice (James MacMillian): Chandosimages/stories/star_ratings/4_stars.jpg

There can be no doubt whatsoever that James MacMillan’s The Sacrifice is one of the most accessible contributions to http://img515.imageshack.us/img515/6249/thesacrifice.jpgthe world of British opera since Benjamin Britten, with audiences responding even as warmly as they did to Thomas Adès’ The Tempest. Both these works were broadcast live on BBC Radio 3, and each of these broadcasts has been cleaned up and recently issued on double CD (Adès on EMI, 2009; MacMillan on Chandos, 2010). Both operas also have composers who enjoy successful careers as conductors, but while Adès conducted The Royal Opera House forces at Covent Garden, it was unfortunate that on the night when The Sacrifice was broadcast from the Wales Millennium Theatre with Welsh National Opera, MacMillan was unwell and was therefore forced to hand over the reins to Anthony Negus.

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Danielle de Niese: The Mozart Album (Decca)

When booklet notes try to do the critic’s job for you in lavishing praise on the recording you’re about to listen to, I’m images/stories/mozart album - de niese.jpgimmediately suspicious. Brian Dickie’s eulogy written for Danielle de Niese’ s second solo album gushes forth the most flowery prose about how she is so perfectly suited to the music and sings it so wonderfully. It represents all that is wrong with the state of the classical recording industry today, namely that young artists, catapulted into the limelight, are marketed at the expense of the actual music- making. It would be far preferable to let de Niese’s singing speak for itself than be told what to think beforehand.

 

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Cecilia Bartoli: Sacrificium (Decca)images/stories/star_ratings/4-half_stars.jpg

Music has had some fabulously controversial performers in the past: Glenn Gould’s antics with Bach; Jacqueline Du Pré –images/stories/sacrificium bartoli.jpg over-aggressive or musically impassioned?; and I’d better not even start on Callas. Surely one of the top dividers of musical opinion today is the mezzo-soprano, Cecilia Bartoli. Bartoli is the very epitome of operatic marmite, causing some critics to fall over themselves the moment she utters a single note, while others find her performances utterly repulsive, especially her characteristic facial expressions.

 

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Tom Jones: Naxos

 

Naxos has given us a virtually note- complete performance of Edward German’s (1862-1936) turn of the century operetta masterpiece, Tom Jones. German, whose name is almost unknown today despite a handful of recent commercial recordings of assorted operas, symphonies and chamber pieces, was one of the most important and popular composers of the period running through the first decade of the 20th century, and was active in teaching, performance, and musical research. Himself an Edwardian bachelor, German is or was, perhaps, best known for Merrie England, an archaizing musical comedy which turns the Virgin Queen from the vengeful and dread monarch of Donizetti into a frustrated but ultimately kind-hearted spinster - Jane Marple, but without the latter’s keen powers of observation. German was well-respected by such contemporaries as Gilbert, Sullivan and Sir Edward Elgar for his direct melodic appeal as well as for the sophisticated quality of his orchestrations, which in fact here can be fleetingly redolent of the Russian school.

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La Rondine: Naxos

 

La Rondine has always been the Cinderella of Puccini’s mature operas. His publisher, Ricordi, rejected it and even theimages/stories/la   rondine naxos.jpg composer himself wasn’t entirely satisfied, revising it on a couple of occasions. In recent times, interest in the opera has been revived largely through being championed by Angela Gheorghiu and Roberto Alagna, both on disc and in opera houses around the world. It’s a slight piece, an hour and a half long, originally commissioned by the Vienna Carltheater as an operetta, and is lighter and frothier than La traviata, whose plot it most resembles. Naxos’ new recording comes from a performance staged at the 2007 Puccini Festival at the composer’s home, Torre del Lago. The story concerns Magda, a kept woman, who leaves Rambaldo, her protector, to be with Ruggero, the young man she falls in love with.

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Macbeth: Naxos

When the http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/3221/naxosmacbeth.jpgBallet gets the longest applause of the night in a performance of Verdi’s Macbeth, you know you’re in trouble! So it proves on this release from Naxos of a live performance from the open-air Sferisterio Opera Festival in Macerata recorded in 2007. I’m sure if I had been there, it would have made for a pleasant summer evening’s entertainment, especially after a bowl of pasta and a few glasses of Montepulciano, but listening at home on an empty stomach proves an unpalatable experience. The recording was made by Dynamic, who specialise in live recordings, usually of rarer repertoire, so I initially wondered why they hadn’t released it on their own label. Then I gave the discs a spin.

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Stabat Mater: BISimages/stories/star_ratings/4-half_stars.jpg

This is not the first disc Dame Emma Kirkby, Daniel Taylor and the Theatre of Early Music have made. Their first joint-images/stories/bis stabat mater 1.jpgrelease also bore the Stabat Mater theme, that time in the context of Scarlatti’s music (ATMA, 2005). Although that disc received many accolades and the performances themselves were very secure, it was marred by some balance problems, with the instruments occasionally sounding much too prominent.

 

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Simone Kermes: Lava, Deutsche Harmonia Mundiimages/stories/star_ratings/4_stars.jpg

Having been bombarded by CD recitals of recycled Handel arias by every soprano under the sun, it is very refreshing toimages/stories/lava simone kermes small.jpg discover this adventurous recital of mostly unknown repertoire dedicated to the masters of the Neapolitan opera scene of the early part of the 18th century: Pergolesi, Porpora, Vinci, Leo and Hasse. The ensemble consists of a string quartet, augmented in a few arias by two oboes and two horns. Considering the undramatic sound of many of Alan Curtis’s recordings (Ferdinando in particular) which enjoy larger instrumental forces, it is astounding to hear the vibrancy, accuracy and pure joy such a small ensemble can achieve on this CD.

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Ivor Gurney Songs: Naxosimages/stories/star_ratings/3-half_stars.jpg

 

Gurney’s songs today may not be as well known as his war poetry, which is ironic when one considers that he viewed images/stories/gurney songs.jpghimself as being first and foremost a composer. However, a recording like this one by Naxos with mezzo-soprano Susan Bickley and pianist Iain Burnside, makes one yearn to hear many more of his compositions. It is a rare gift to be quite so adept in both fields, but then Gurney was an extraordinary man who led an extraordinary life. Famously inspired to become a composer after listening to a performance of Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis by Ralph Vaughan Williams at the Three Choirs Festival in Gloucester, Gurney wrote more than three hundred songs. Many of his poems and compositions were inspired by the landscape of the Gloucestershire countryside, a place which was of great personal importance to him. Sadly, Gurney was declared insane and committed to Barnwood Mental Hospital in 1922.

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Dido & Aeneas: Chandosimages/stories/star_ratings/4-half_stars.jpg

 

Henry Purcell’s tragic chamber opera about doomed love has been the subject of numerous recordings, with no less than images/stories/dido  aeneas chandos small.jpgFlagstad, Baker, Norman and Hunt Lieberson all offering up their interpretations of the noble Carthaginian Queen. It comes therefore as no surprise that today’s reigning Dido, Sarah Connolly, would wish to record her interpretation for posterity. In short, hers is a magnificent assumption, which in the opinion of this reviewer, sets a new benchmark for excellence in a field already hotly contested by some of the greatest singers of the past century.

 

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Patrizia Ciofi: Live

 

Italian soprano Patrizia Ciofi has built up quite a following amongst the opera cognoscenti for her beautiful, mellow and intensely moving voice. As at home in rare baroque opera as she is in the demanding heroines of Bellini, Donizetti or Verdi, Ciofi has garnered a considerable reputation for well-schooled musicianship allied to an affecting stage presence. The voice and the intelligence with which it is used is amongst the most compelling of today. Anyone who saw her Alaide in Bellini’s La Straniera with Opera Rara in 2007 at the Royal Festival Hall, were left in no doubt that here was a major international talent.

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Christine Brewer: Great Operatic Arias

Christine Brewer possesses possibly the finest dramatic soprano in the world today, and this wonderful collection of arias sung in English is a stunning testament to this assertion. Having already recorded a memorable Fidelio for Chandos, this CD is a worthy follow-up recital from the same label, with powerhouse performances from Tannhäuser and Oberon sitting alongside rich and frothy arias from Countess Maritza and Giuditta. Her versatility is never in doubt and the results rarely less than exceptional.

 

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Christine Brewer: Great Operatic Arias 2

 

Following a critically acclaimed recital disc with Chandos back in 2005, we now have another offering from Christine Brewer singing great operatic arias. Although the voice has lost none of its lustre and heroic volume, this selection is marginally less successful than last time. The programme itself is certainly varied and quite interesting, with surprising entries from Handel, Britten, Dvorak, Korngold and Menotti, whilst the “meat" comes in the form of Wagner, Beethoven, Mozart and Gluck, with light relief offered by Lehár and Richard Rodgers

 

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Last Updated ( Thursday, 27 February 2014 20:31 )  

Recent Reviews

Puccini: Tosca

Renée Fleming, our hostess with the mostest at the Metropolitan Opera’s latest cinema relay of Tosca a few weeks ago, urged us – as ever – to experience opera first-hand and to ‘come visit the Met’ or to support your local opera company. The Opera Britannia excursions budget wouldn’t get you as far as York, let alone New York, so my local company it was and performing the same opera too. Tosca is very much the safe, financial bolster to Welsh National Opera’s Tudor trilogy in its autumn season – a crowd-pleaser of a production excavated from 1992, but which seemed even older.


 

Humperdinck: Hänsel und Gretel

And so to Milton Keynes, pursued by a perishing wind fit to crack the famous concrete cows. The Milton Keynes Theatre, as a venue, is one of the jewels in the ATG crown, big enough to house almost any touring product, with spacious and well-designed auditorium and foyers. Unfortunately it is marooned in one of those soulless retail areas surrounded by a sea of mediocre chain outlets which offer the same tat or that which passes for food in a thousand other identical areas the world over. Whether it was position or the icy blasts which accounted for the poorly populated house is hard to say.


 

Mozart: The Magic Flute

For all the risk-taking in the operatic world, productions which are guaranteed bums-on-seats bankers are like Nibelung gold. To scrap not one but two such productions is a brave move for English National Opera this season. We shall see what Christopher Alden inflicts on Rigoletto in the spring, replacing Jonathan Miller’s famous Little Italy staging. Meanwhile, Nicholas Hytner’s much loved production of The Magic Flute has finally been laid to rest (after a few ‘absolutely your last chance to see’ revivals), replaced with this new one by Simon McBurney and Complicite.


 

Shostakovich: The Nose

Described at the time as “an anarchist’s hand grenade,” The Nosewas not well received and soon disappeared from view, although Malko, one of Shostakovich’s teachers at the Conservatoire, recognised the quality of the score. It was composed in 1927-28 and given a concert performance, against Shostakovich’s better judgment, in 1929: “The Nose loses all meaning if it is seen just as a musical composition. For the music springs only from the action...It is clear to me that a concert performance of The Nose will destroy it."


 

News

ENO goes widescreen

After resisting the prevailing tide for opera houses beaming their wares to a worldwide cinema audience, English National Opera has seen the light. From 2014, selected productions will be screened at 300 cinemas around the UK and beyond, starting with its revival of David Alden’s production of Peter Grimes, starring Stuart Skelton. A new production, by Terry Gilliam, of Berlioz’s Benvenuto Cellini will also be relayed. Gilliam’s earlier Berlioz adventure, The Damnation of Faust, was broadcast on television.


 

 

Poetry Corner

Biography: Mary Robertson is an Emeritus Professor in Neuropsychiatry at University College London and visiting Professor at St George’s Hospital Medical School, London. Aside from being an opera devotee, Mary is a published poet and photographer.

(New poems added: 04/08/2010)

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Around the Houses

Dmitri Platanias will sing the title role when the Royal Opera revives its new production of Nabucco. Mariusz Kwiecien will be joined by Saimir Pirgu in Steffen Aarfing's production of Szymanowski's King Roger at Covent Garden in 2015. The Royal Opera will stage Andrea Chenier in 2014/15 with Jonas Kaufmann, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Željko Lucic.

Anna Netrebko is due to sing the role of Lady Macbeth for a single performance at the Bavarian State Opera in June 2014.

Maria Agresta will sing Lucrezia in Verdi's I due Foscari in the 2014-15 season at Covent Garden. Placido Domingo does the Doge double, adding the baritone role of Francesca Foscari to his Simon Boccanegra.

Corinne Winters, fresh from her triumph as Violetta in ENO's production of La traviata, is to return to the Coliseum next season as Teresa in Berlioz's Benvenuto CelliniMichael Spyres sings the title role in a production which sees the return ofTerry Gilliam to the director's seat, after his Damnation of Faust debut.

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"Around the Houses" concentrates on providing the latest news on future plans for opera companies around the globe, artists schedules, cancellations and interesting snippets of information. We will try and avoid unsubstantiated gossip wherever possible, but all of our sources will remain completely confidential.  If you would like to advise us about potential news for this section, then please feel free to email us at info@opera-britannia.com.

Coming Soon

Reviews to be published shortly:



 


 


CD Reviews

Vivaldi: Catone in Utica (Naive)

Althoughhttp://img197.imageshack.us/img197/8908/gkdw.JPG he claimed to have composed around ninety operas, there cannot be many left in the archives of the Biblioteca Nazionale in Turin for Naïve to record in its ongoing Vivaldi Edition if you discount pasticcios, reworkings and incomplete works. Their latest offering, the fourteenth opera in the series, falls into the latter category, for only Acts II and III of Catone in Utica have survived. The opera was written to celebrate the culmination of his third and final season at Verona’s Teatro dell’Accademia Filarmonica – a profitable success for the composer. Premiered in 1737, it is unknown whether Act I was even written by Vivaldi himself, or whether music by other composers was employed.

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Recital Reviews

Anne Sofie von Otter: Alumni Series

Milton Court, 23rd November 2013

When this http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/7950/npze.jpgrecital was first drawn to my attention, such is my regard for the Swedish mezzo that I immediately withdrew from reviewing Albert Herring some two hundred yards down the road in the Barbican, and enthusiastically opted for what I thought was an evening of French chansons and mélodies. What a prospect! Anne Sofie von Otter let loose on Chausson and Debussy, Fauré and Poulenc, perhaps some Gounod and Bizet, with maybe a little Délibes and/or Satie by way of let-your-hair-down encore material. All with her long-term musical accompanist Bengt Forsberg summoning up the necessary style. Rapture guaranteed, for which I arrived fully prepared.

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DVD Reviews

Donizetti: Lucrezia Borgia (EuroArts)

Scholars now http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/5228/vu6o.jpgcast doubt on Lucrezia Borgia’s credentials as mass poisoner, but Donizetti’s operatic treatment on her historical character would have us believe she spiked drinks with cantarella and laced dishes with deadly nightshade like nobody’s business. Lucrezia, here on her fourth marriage (in reality, her third) to Alfonso d’Este, Duke of Ferrara, is reunited with Gennaro, her long-lost son. Unfortunately, she withholds this vital information from him and from her husband, who suspects her of conducting an affair. It’s as free an interpretation as the lusty television series The Borgias, which never got as far as this in Lucrezia’s marital history, but none the worse for that.

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